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Can Divining Rods be Used to Communicate with the Spirit World?

by on Jan.16, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

In November, I went on the Mobile Ghost Tour.  This tour of downtown Mobile took us through many of Mobile’s most haunted locations.   It also gave us a brief introduction to ghost hunting with divining rods

Historically, divining rods were a forked or y shaped branch that would be used by “water” or “willow” witches to do something called dousing.  Dousing is a type of divination that was used to find water or wells.  Dousing was also used to find all sorts of buried gems, minerals and treasures.  Divining rods have been used in this context for thousands of years and they are nothing new.  Many mystics and spiritualists have taken this method of divination quite seriously and multiple books and theories have been published on this topic.    A french priest and douser, Alex Bouly, renamed dousing  radieshtesia in 1927 and thus added an air of respectability to the practice.

However,  using copper divining rods to communicate with the dead is a relatively new practice. The practice is easy.  During our ghost hunt, we stood very still in a vacant lot where a homeless man had been murdered.   It was also the site of a famous lynching and an old cemetery.  We also went to the famously haunted Richard’s house and the old Masonic Temple. There were many ghosts for us to talk too.  We held the rods up and asked questions to the spirits.  We held one rod in each hand directly in front of us.  Theoretically,  the rods were supposed to respond to our questions.  Their movement should be driven by spiritual activity.   We held a rod in each hand and if they crossed that was a no and if they seperated that was a yes.  They could also point in response to our questions. 

I did a lot of experimentation with these rods and what I found was that unless you can keep your hands as still as granite, much of the movement and fluctionat in the rods was due more to very minor shifts and movements in my arms and hands.   After a few hours, I determined that the divining rods responded too easily to very minor movement to be reliable.  I did manage to convince the tour guide I was a lightning rod for the spirit world by moving my pinky slightly to the right which created a swirling motion in the rod that was quiet impressive.  Even when I was attempting to be perfectly still, any minor tremor resulted in massive movements in the rods. 

Behavioral observation lead me to believe that the rods were responding similarly to my fellow ghost hunters.  I observed minor fluctuations in their hands and slight movements that I don’t even think they were aware of. 

In conclusion,  using the diving rods for ghost hunting was fun.  Everyone on the tour enjoyed it, but I don’t think they were any real link to the unknown.  I think they were more a link to how still we could keep our hands and arms.  These rods are very easy to come by and can be purchased on amazon.com if you would like to experiment with them yourself.  Below are some of the pictures of the locations we ghost hunted at. 

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Can Divining Rods be Used to Communicate with the Spirit World?

by on Jan.16, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

In November, I went on the Mobile Ghost Tour.  This tour of downtown Mobile took us through many of Mobile’s most haunted locations.   It also gave us a brief introduction to ghost hunting with divining rods

Historically, divining rods were a forked or y shaped branch that would be used by “water” or “willow” witches to do something called dousing.  Dousing is a type of divination that was used to find water or wells.  Dousing was also used to find all sorts of buried gems, minerals and treasures.  Divining rods have been used in this context for thousands of years and they are nothing new.  Many mystics and spiritualists have taken this method of divination quite seriously and multiple books and theories have been published on this topic.    A french priest and douser, Alex Bouly, renamed dousing  radieshtesia in 1927 and thus added an air of respectability to the practice.

However,  using copper divining rods to communicate with the dead is a relatively new practice. The practice is easy.  During our ghost hunt, we stood very still in a vacant lot where a homeless man had been murdered.   It was also the site of a famous lynching and an old cemetery.  We also went to the famously haunted Richard’s house and the old Masonic Temple. There were many ghosts for us to talk too.  We held the rods up and asked questions to the spirits.  We held one rod in each hand directly in front of us.  Theoretically,  the rods were supposed to respond to our questions.  Their movement should be driven by spiritual activity.   We held a rod in each hand and if they crossed that was a no and if they seperated that was a yes.  They could also point in response to our questions. 

I did a lot of experimentation with these rods and what I found was that unless you can keep your hands as still as granite, much of the movement and fluctionat in the rods was due more to very minor shifts and movements in my arms and hands.   After a few hours, I determined that the divining rods responded too easily to very minor movement to be reliable.  I did manage to convince the tour guide I was a lightning rod for the spirit world by moving my pinky slightly to the right which created a swirling motion in the rod that was quiet impressive.  Even when I was attempting to be perfectly still, any minor tremor resulted in massive movements in the rods. 

Behavioral observation lead me to believe that the rods were responding similarly to my fellow ghost hunters.  I observed minor fluctuations in their hands and slight movements that I don’t even think they were aware of. 

In conclusion,  using the diving rods for ghost hunting was fun.  Everyone on the tour enjoyed it, but I don’t think they were any real link to the unknown.  I think they were more a link to how still we could keep our hands and arms.  These rods are very easy to come by and can be purchased on amazon.com if you would like to experiment with them yourself.  Below are some of the pictures of the locations we ghost hunted at. 

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Cleansing a Cursed Mask

by on Jan.04, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

Cursed objections seem abundant today.  All you have to do is search for cursed objects on Ebay to see a million everyday objects that contain ghosts or demons or killed someone.  I believe most of these objects are just things people found around the house and decided to try to sell and make money off of.  I collect historic objects and have bid on Viking antiquities at various auctions.  None of them have contained any curses or malignant spirits.  I even bought a haunted doll on Ebay once out of curiosity.  It is cute, but harmless.  I believe truly haunted or cursed items are rare.

My sister has recently gotten into energy work.  She believes in realigning chakras and helping cleanse people of negative energy.  My sister is also a medium.  One of her clients gave her a mask because the mask “wanted” her and the mask had negative energy.  The client believed the mask was drawn to Rose and had been scared  by haunted activity that had occured around the mask.  I am very honest with my sister.  She knows I am skeptical of her work.  I have a degree in clinical psychology and have practiced for ten years.  I tend to believe in cognitive behavioral theory rather than in misaligned chakras or bad energy.  However, this mask my sister got definitely possessed something.  From the moment it entered her life, it spoke to her.  She had to get rid of it.  Others around her saw spirits associated with the mask.  The previous owner was terrified of it.  After working with the mask, she was able to cleanse it and the ghost she believes she has been able to free the spirit that was in the mask and return it to its original owner.   Although I remain skeptical of my sister’s work,  I find it beautiful that she was able to cleanse a cursed object and return it’s owner.

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Cleansing a Cursed Mask

by on Jan.04, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

Cursed objections seem abundant today.  All you have to do is search for cursed objects on Ebay to see a million everyday objects that contain ghosts or demons or killed someone.  I believe most of these objects are just things people found around the house and decided to try to sell and make money off of.  I collect historic objects and have bid on Viking antiquities at various auctions.  None of them have contained any curses or malignant spirits.  I even bought a haunted doll on Ebay once out of curiosity.  It is cute, but harmless.  I believe truly haunted or cursed items are rare.

My sister has recently gotten into energy work.  She believes in realigning chakras and helping cleanse people of negative energy.  My sister is also a medium.  One of her clients gave her a mask because the mask “wanted” her and the mask had negative energy.  The client believed the mask was drawn to Rose and had been scared  by haunted activity that had occured around the mask.  I am very honest with my sister.  She knows I am skeptical of her work.  I have a degree in clinical psychology and have practiced for ten years.  I tend to believe in cognitive behavioral theory rather than in misaligned chakras or bad energy.  However, this mask my sister got definitely possessed something.  From the moment it entered her life, it spoke to her.  She had to get rid of it.  Others around her saw spirits associated with the mask.  The previous owner was terrified of it.  After working with the mask, she was able to cleanse it and the ghost she believes she has been able to free the spirit that was in the mask and return it to its original owner.   Although I remain skeptical of my sister’s work,  I find it beautiful that she was able to cleanse a cursed object and return it’s owner.

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The Ghosts of the Fort Conde Inn

by on Dec.28, 2017, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

The Fort Conde Inn in Mobile Alabama is one of the most beautiful bed and breakfasts I have stayed in.  It is fair to say I haven’t stayed in many b&b’s but that doesn’t mean that this rare Inn isn’t lovely.  This old, plantation style house whispers of old Southern ghost stories before you even know there are ghost stories there.  The house is in a lonely corner of the busy downtown of Mobile and theentire street it is on feels strangely out of time.  Just to the right of tall, modern sky scrapers and a garishly modern convention center there is a small park dedicated to the history of Mardi Gras.   American Mardi Gras as we know it was founded in Mobile and transported to New Orleans. The little park serves as a reminder of that.  Past the park, there are interstates and busy roads but in between the park and the roads there is a quiet place with an old church and old buildings that seem to be almost forgotten. The old court house and Fort Le Conde stand watch to the one road that leads to this quiet place where history seems to own the roads.

This quiet place is owned almost entirely by the same developer.  He bought this area for The Fort Conde Inn and although the main building is the one most associated with the hotel, the entire neighborhood is part of the Inn and is owned by the same developer.  This area was once the red light district in Mobile.  If you came off a boat and you wanted a bit of fun, the building to the left of the main Inn was once a brothel and the other buildings were bars and houses of ill repute.  Built in 1836, the main hotel was once owned by a wealthy plantation owner, but once this little corner of Mobile went down hill, it was abandoned to decay.

Eventually, even the prostitutes and drug dealers abandoned the corner of Mobile and just let it fall to ruin.  But thankfully, it was purchased and re purposed and is now an Inn with cabins and a venue for weddings.  The cobblestone streets and gas streetlights give the entire area a feeling of other worldliness.   Ghost stories abound on these cobblestone streets and everyone tells them a bit differently.  The internet speaks of clawing and disembodied voices, but those that work there say that they can’t imagine any bad spirits in the Fort Conde Inn.  One employee spoke of an old civil war soldier who liked to sit on the front porch of one of the old houses and watch the Inn. She spoke of the ghost of a prostitute who could be seen through one of the windows.  The ghost tour guide didn’t say much about specific ghosts but said that bad things must have happened in the old red light district.  She said ghost stories where prolific, but was oddly reluctant to tell them, perhaps because I was staying there.

I didn’t see any ghosts while I was there.  I enjoyed a brilliant breakfast and pet the cats that wandered in and out of the courtyard.  I sat on the porch at night and listened to the eerie silence in such a busy downtown area, but I didn’t see anything creepy.   I hope the ghost stories are true, however, because The Fort Conde Inn feels so haunting it should be haunted.

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The Ghosts of the Fort Conde Inn

by on Dec.28, 2017, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

The Fort Conde Inn in Mobile Alabama is one of the most beautiful bed and breakfasts I have stayed in.  It is fair to say I haven’t stayed in many b&b’s but that doesn’t mean that this rare Inn isn’t lovely.  This old, plantation style house whispers of old Southern ghost stories before you even know there are ghost stories there.  The house is in a lonely corner of the busy downtown of Mobile and theentire street it is on feels strangely out of time.  Just to the right of tall, modern sky scrapers and a garishly modern convention center there is a small park dedicated to the history of Mardi Gras.   American Mardi Gras as we know it was founded in Mobile and transported to New Orleans. The little park serves as a reminder of that.  Past the park, there are interstates and busy roads but in between the park and the roads there is a quiet place with an old church and old buildings that seem to be almost forgotten. The old court house and Fort Le Conde stand watch to the one road that leads to this quiet place where history seems to own the roads.

This quiet place is owned almost entirely by the same developer.  He bought this area for The Fort Conde Inn and although the main building is the one most associated with the hotel, the entire neighborhood is part of the Inn and is owned by the same developer.  This area was once the red light district in Mobile.  If you came off a boat and you wanted a bit of fun, the building to the left of the main Inn was once a brothel and the other buildings were bars and houses of ill repute.  Built in 1836, the main hotel was once owned by a wealthy plantation owner, but once this little corner of Mobile went down hill, it was abandoned to decay.

Eventually, even the prostitutes and drug dealers abandoned the corner of Mobile and just let it fall to ruin.  But thankfully, it was purchased and re purposed and is now an Inn with cabins and a venue for weddings.  The cobblestone streets and gas streetlights give the entire area a feeling of other worldliness.   Ghost stories abound on these cobblestone streets and everyone tells them a bit differently.  The internet speaks of clawing and disembodied voices, but those that work there say that they can’t imagine any bad spirits in the Fort Conde Inn.  One employee spoke of an old civil war soldier who liked to sit on the front porch of one of the old houses and watch the Inn. She spoke of the ghost of a prostitute who could be seen through one of the windows.  The ghost tour guide didn’t say much about specific ghosts but said that bad things must have happened in the old red light district.  She said ghost stories where prolific, but was oddly reluctant to tell them, perhaps because I was staying there.

I didn’t see any ghosts while I was there.  I enjoyed a brilliant breakfast and pet the cats that wandered in and out of the courtyard.  I sat on the porch at night and listened to the eerie silence in such a busy downtown area, but I didn’t see anything creepy.   I hope the ghost stories are true, however, because The Fort Conde Inn feels so haunting it should be haunted.

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The Mysteries that lurk in the Shadows of the House of the Sun King: A True Story

by on Nov.04, 2017, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

There is an abandoned house at the end of a street in my neighborhood.  For years, it has been a popular spot for urban explorers and kids looking for a bit of adventure. We first noticed the house five years ago when a legion of fire trucks rushed to the woods behind our neighborhood.  We had no idea there was a house in the woods until we saw that someone had attempted to burn it down.  The fire was put out, but once we knew it was there, our curiosity about the house became endless.

The  house is creepy and strange.  The upstairs is laid out like a a daycare and filled with forgotten toys and the downstairs features a massive mural of the sun labeled “The Sun King” in French.  I have written about the house before as it feels haunted and I always believed it was haunted.  It is one of those places that looks haunted from far away and when you step in it the hairs on the back of your neck stand up.

A few weeks ago, they began clearing the lot the house stood on.  The house used to be hidden in a small forest, but all the trees have been knocked down and the house is even more damaged than it had been to begin with.  With the trees down, we could see there was a barn behind the house and there was more to the house than we initially thought, so we decided to go exploring again.  We also felt more free to explore as the gate had been taken down and all the no trespassing signs had been removed.  It seemed open for anyone and there was nothing to indicate we shouldn’t explore.  From here, I began to feel like I had walked into a horror movie or murder mystery.  Even as I told my husband about what happened, he laughed and asked me if I was sure I wasn’t talking about the movie “Sinister”.

We walked into the house and found mountains of boxes everywhere.  The roof had partially collapsed and boxes from the attic had fallen into the garage.  In the boxes, were the remains of a family’s most important documents.  We found social security numbers, retirement funds, bank accounts and access numbers, birth certificates, death records, and court documents.  Family photos were mixed in and laid out naked.  Most interestingly, we found a day planner that had notes in it like “J. shot the dog.  I recorded it.  Police notified.”   “Harassment case filed.”  “J attacked me again today. Attorney and Police notified.”  The further I read the worse it got.  We found letters filing for restraining orders.  The woman who wrote the journal seemed constantly afraid.   She had notes documenting sexual abuse and violence and  animal murder. We kept digging, we couldn’t help ourselves and we found that the man and woman who had lived there divorced.  She got the children and accused him of many horrible things.  Clearly,

she was afraid.   He wasn’t paying child support and was constantly harassing and stalking her.  I liked this woman.  I think she was French.  She had meetings at the French consulate.  She owned horses and was involved in dressage.  I think the barn in the back was for horses.  The woman’s notes made her seem like a loving mother who was trying to maintain normalcy but couldn’t stop the fear that was a daily reminder of her J.  She obsessed over barking dogs and the neighbor’s poodle.  Everything scared her.  It was possible she was paranoid, but I am more prone to believe the fear was based in reality.  At this point, I wouldn’t have been surprised to find her skeleton buried in the walls.  It was dark and sitting in this half burnt, abandoned home reading this felt more than a little creepy.  Every stupid, horror movie I had ever seen began flashing in front my eyes.

After we were done with the papers, we explored the barn, where the two cars had just been abandoned.   We are going to continue researching this case because it feels like whatever happened in this house, it couldn’t have been good.  The house was abandoned with important documents and notes and cars and records in it.  Someone tried to burn it down.  The woman who had lived there had lived in constant fear of J. who killed her dogs and attacked her.  The house definitely feels haunted by something.  My son and I are going to keep digging because this house feels like it houses a mystery and a haunting that probably shouldn’t be forgotten.  So we will keep reading and see if we can find out what really happened in this burnt, corpse of a house.  Maybe nothing special happened, but I still want to know.

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5 Forgotten Halloween Traditions to Bring Back

by on Oct.25, 2017, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

Halloween is my favorite Holiday.  It has a very long history that is often forgotten.    Although Halloween’s roots can be traced back to pagan practices,  it’s name came from Christians.  Halloween was the time of year when the ancient Celts believed that the veil between this world and the “otherworld” became thin allowing for spirits to have more access to our world.  This was, naturally, quite terrifying to the Celts.  In order to protect themselves from the spirits,  people built enormous bonfires and cast bones into them to scare the spirits away.  They also dressed up as terrifying spirits to confuse wicked spirits into believing they were spirits themselves.  The Celts called Halloween Samhain.   It was the Catholics that came up with the name Halloween.  The early Christians were masters at taking local pagan holidays and integrating into their own Christian days.  Even Christmas was stolen from Saturnalia.   Catholics took Samhain and made it All Saints day, a day to celebrate the spirits of all the deceased saint.  All Hallow’s Eve was the night before All Saints day.  The term All Hallow’s Eve was eventually shortened to Halloween. 

Through Halloween’s long history there have been many traditions that have been simply left behind.  This saddens me.  So here are some I think we should bring back.

1.Colcannon:   This is an Irish dish made with cabbage, kale, and potatoes.  Small coins and prizes are usually hidden in this dish making it a little treasure hunt.   I admit,  this dish sounds repugnant, however,  if altered slightly to regular potatoes the treasure hunt in dinner form is great fun for kids and adults.  Just don’t swallow the pennies.

2. Barmbrack:   This is another food tradition.  It is a tradition Irish fruitcake baked into a ring.  Items are placed within the cake that for tell the future.  For example,  if you find the wedding ring, you’ll be married soon. Finding coins predicts great wealth. 

3.  Tricking:  Back in the old days the trick in trick or treating had meaning.  People would hit the streets causing mayhem and playing tricks on people in their costumes and the only way to avoid the “tricking” was to give out treats.  What happened to the tricks?  Not saying  you should set your neighbor’s lawn on fire or anything, but if stingy old Ms. Brown isn’t giving out candy this year, some fake poo on her porch might be perfect.

4.  Bonfires:   Why not scare bad spirits away with fires?  Fires are fun.  I’m building a fire in my fire pit this Halloween.

5. Fortune Telling:  There are many types of fortune telling done on Halloween night, but one’s fortune was always believe to be most easily predicted on Halloween.  Whether you were reading tea leaves, apple peals, or gazing into mirrors to see your future, a prediction made on Halloween was always accurate.

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The Haunting of Fort Matanzas

by on Oct.20, 2017, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

When you are visiting Florida it is easy to forget its history.  It is easy to get lost in cities and beaches and theme parks. However, two hours North of Orlando, the oldest city in the United States sits quietly on the beach whispering of ghost stories and old wars.  St. Augustine’s history goes back to the very first European settlers in the Americas.  Its stories are as old and tortured as any and the history of Fort Matanzas bears witness to this.
Fort Matanzas is located on Rattlesnake Island just south of St. Augustine.  Fort Matanzas’ was closed when we visited.  Hurricane Irma had took its toll and the boat that transports visitors to Rattlesnake Island had been shut down and visitors banned.  We could not explore its haunted history or see it for ourselves, but its tragedies and ghost stories seem to resonate more because we were banned from going.
Although the current Fort Matanzas was built in 1742, its history is much older than that.  Matanzas means slaughter in Spanish and there is a reason the fort is named after a slaughter.  In 1562, when Spain and France were locked in a battle for Supremacy, King Phillip II of Spain learned that the French, under the leadership of Rene De Laudonniere had established a colony on Spanish land in Florida.   The French settlers were Protestants and Spain was the most devoutly Catholic country in Europe.  When King Phillip learned the settlers were Huguenots he acted fiercely.  After a series of battles and some political maneuvering, over 300 unarmed Huguenots were slaughtered after they failed to convert to Catholicism.  A few survived the massacre after converting to Catholicism, but most were slaughtered.  Thus the fort built on Rattlesnake Island and the River it guarded were both named Mantanzas after the slaughter. 
Death followed the Small Island and fort after that.  The current Fort, built in 1745, saw many skirmishes and deaths as the land transferred from the Spanish to the British to the Americans.  During its brief period of use this stone, Gothic fort was used to house convicts, slaves, and prisoners.  After the Americans took the fort it was never used as a fort and quickly fell into disrepair until the National Park Service took over. 

Now, it is visited by tourists and its dark history is mostly a memory.  Those who visit at night, however, see its history in the ghosts that wander the island.  They report seeing phantom orbs and strange lights.  Faces linger beneath the water and shadows wander the corners of the old fort.  Its history still lives there in the phantoms that wander its shores. 

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Halloween Horror Nights 2017

by on Oct.15, 2017, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

Universal Studio’s Orlando Halloween Horror Nights is a Halloween Horror extravaganza that can be rivaled by none.  I have spent a decade reviewing haunted houses and visiting haunted locations.   This is the ultimate haunted experience for lovers of the dark and macabre.  This is my second year attending Halloween Horror nights and 2017 was a much better experience than 2016 for me.  I say for me because there is a significant amount of personal preference involved in ranking Halloween Horror Nights and their events.  My entire group agreed that this year was better than last year, but when it came to ranking the houses we fought for the better part of an hour.  Due to this, I am going to do two separate rankings on the top 3 features of 2017 Horror Nights.  The first ranking is my perspective.  The second is a group perspective based on other people I have talked to.  I will post this later in the week.
Halloween Horror Nights consists of 8 separate themed haunted houses that all contain the budget that would be expected of a theme park.  They also contain 6 scare zones.  Our group usually enjoys the scare zones as much if not more than the houses because these are areas of the park decorated and themed to submerge you in a horror experience you can be part of and linger in.  The houses are more intricate but contain guards that yell at you to “move along” if you stop for more than a moment to study the sets or décor or view a jump scare event. 
My Top Favorite Events for this year were:
1.1       The Trick or Treat Scare Zone:   If you have seen this lovely homage to Halloween Horror this scare zone is immediately recognizable by the little Sam that wanders the zone. He is cute and disturbing.  The movie Trick or Treat is a horror anthology tied together by Sam.  Sam is a little fellow who punishes those who do not respect the spirit of Halloween.  He quietly observes all the mayhem associated with Halloween. The scare zone was wonderful not just because it was so true to the film but also because it was beautifully rendered.  Jack-O- Lanterns hung from trees.   Lights

turned the zone into a glowing orange Halloween extravaganza. 

2.2      Dead Waters Haunted House:   This house was spectacular from the first moment you stepped into it.  The facade of a sinking 1800’s steam ship transported you back in time.  As you step into the ship, the ground shifts beneath your feet and the walk way remains crooked and slanted so you feel like you are in a sinking ship.  The décor and actors are a juxtaposition of decaying slave owners and voodoo monsters.  The horror is unrelenting and the jump scares are solid.  Voodoo rights add an extra bit of horror.  This house was meticulously crafted.  Every bit of scenery and décor added to a feeling of Louisiana horror. 
33      American Horror Story:   I disagreed with most people on this one.  There were three seasons of American Horror Story represented in this haunted house.  There was Roanoke, Asylum, and Coven.  I loved this house because of the details from the series it carefully wove into each room.  It was like reliving these seasons.  I also loved it because it captured the horror from each of these seasons and the best parts of the seasons.
This was the 27thannual Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Studios.  Next year,  we are going to go on the R.I.P tours so we can see the houses without the crowds and the staff barking “move along” at us every time we stumbled or slowed down for a moment.  

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