From the Web

SPIRITS with SPIRITS (Aug 13th, 2018)

by on Aug.13, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Hunters of Urban Los Angeles | Go to Original Post

GHOULA meets for cocktails in haunted places on the 13th of the month. “SPIRITS with SPIRITS” is a casual social gathering of regional ghost-hunters and those that just like ghost stories. Open to all, from the curious skeptic to the passionate phantom pursuer. Make friends, and toast a ghost! Let’s put the “Boo!” back into “booze.”

All those who attend will receive a free (square) GHOULA. button. If you already have one, please wear it so others can find you, without asking the staff about our group. (i.e. IF THIS IS YOUR FIRST TIME, LOOK FOR SOMEONE WITH A GHOULA BUTTON)

THE DATE: August 13th, 2018 (Monday)
THE PLACE: The Faculty
707 N Heliotrope Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90029 (Map)
THE TIME: 8:00pm to 10:00pm

THE GHOST(S):

During a recent visit to this neighborhood bar, GHOULA discovered that the staff was unaware of (or unwilling to talk about) their haunted reputation. In decades past, the sightings were so common that even the much beloved food critic Jonathan Gold, when reviewing the then restaurant at this location, made a passing reference to the building’s resident “Hollywood ghost.”

No one seems to know for sure how many restaurants/bars have occupied this humble structure, but it appears that this address applied for a liquor license at the end of Prohibition, which would indicate bottle service going back at least to the early 1930s (and possibly illegal hospitality before that). Given the building’s long history, the ghostly young woman seen by (past) staff and patrons could realistically be anyone from any era.

That said, most believe “she” is the spirit of Nina Thoeren, the daughter of the screenwriter Robert Thoeren (who is best known for his involvement with Billy Wilder’s “Some Like it Hot”). On a warm summer night in 1960, minutes after she ended her shift at her workplace, a bookstore on Melrose, while walking to her nearby apartment, the 21 year old was raped and murdered in a car parked on Heliotrope not far from the entrance of this tavern. It is unknown if she was forced into vehicle or if she went inside on her own (maybe to get a lift home). After her killer strangled her with her own red pants, he dragged her lifeless body across the street to hide it among the piles of lumber of a then college building under construction. The perpetrator of this ghastly crime was easily and quickly caught by the authorities.

Even though, this case was sensationalized in the local papers because of the “red slacks” angle and its possible connection/similarities to the “Bouncing Ball Murders” (a string of similar murders at the time in that area involving an unidentified man that would wait for his female victims to walk past while he bounced a rubber ball), this gruesome crime is largely a forgotten piece of this neighborhood’s history. If it is remembered at all, it is because it inspired an infamous artwork (part visual/part performance) by Jean-Jacques Lebel called “Happening Funeral Ceremony of the Anti-Process” that was presented at Europe’s first “Happening” in 1960 (shortly after her death), in which attendees/guests were asked to participate in a faux funeral for a sculpture of a murdered corpse. 

Or, people (and very few now) remember this incident because her ghost still seems to linger on in the area of her murder, and isn’t that part of the reason “ghost stories” persist as well. These are spoken tales that force society to confront tragic and shameful events that civic boosters would prefer we just forget. Does this female phantom just want people to remember her? Some cultures believe that the soul dies a second time when there is no one left to tell their story.

So come out, join us, share ghost stories, toast this ghost, and remember … If you dare!

(to read about the last haunted location… )
(to see a map of previous SPIRITS with SPIRITS locations… )

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SPIRITS with SPIRITS (Aug 13th, 2018)

by on Aug.13, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Hunters of Urban Los Angeles | Go to Original Post

GHOULA meets for cocktails in haunted places on the 13th of the month. “SPIRITS with SPIRITS” is a casual social gathering of regional ghost-hunters and those that just like ghost stories. Open to all, from the curious skeptic to the passionate phantom pursuer. Make friends, and toast a ghost! Let’s put the “Boo!” back into “booze.”

All those who attend will receive a free (square) GHOULA. button. If you already have one, please wear it so others can find you, without asking the staff about our group. (i.e. IF THIS IS YOUR FIRST TIME, LOOK FOR SOMEONE WITH A GHOULA BUTTON)

THE DATE: August 13th, 2018 (Monday)
THE PLACE: The Faculty
707 N Heliotrope Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90029 (Map)
THE TIME: 8:00pm to 10:00pm

THE GHOST(S):

During a recent visit to this neighborhood bar, GHOULA discovered that the staff was unaware of (or unwilling to talk about) their haunted reputation. In decades past, the sightings were so common that even the much beloved food critic Jonathan Gold, when reviewing the then restaurant at this location, made a passing reference to the building’s resident “Hollywood ghost.”

No one seems to know for sure how many restaurants/bars have occupied this humble structure, but it appears that this address applied for a liquor license at the end of Prohibition, which would indicate bottle service going back at least to the early 1930s (and possibly illegal hospitality before that). Given the building’s long history, the ghostly young woman seen by (past) staff and patrons could realistically be anyone from any era.

That said, most believe “she” is the spirit of Nina Thoeren, the daughter of the screenwriter Robert Thoeren (who is best known for his involvement with Billy Wilder’s “Some Like it Hot”). On a warm summer night in 1960, minutes after she ended her shift at her workplace, a bookstore on Melrose, while walking to her nearby apartment, the 21 year old was raped and murdered in a car parked on Heliotrope not far from the entrance of this tavern. It is unknown if she was forced into vehicle or if she went inside on her own (maybe to get a lift home). After her killer strangled her with her own red pants, he dragged her lifeless body across the street to hide it among the piles of lumber of a then college building under construction. The perpetrator of this ghastly crime was easily and quickly caught by the authorities.

Even though, this case was sensationalized in the local papers because of the “red slacks” angle and its possible connection/similarities to the “Bouncing Ball Murders” (a string of similar murders at the time in that area involving an unidentified man that would wait for his female victims to walk past while he bounced a rubber ball), this gruesome crime is largely a forgotten piece of this neighborhood’s history. If it is remembered at all, it is because it inspired an infamous artwork (part visual/part performance) by Jean-Jacques Lebel called “Happening Funeral Ceremony of the Anti-Process” that was presented at Europe’s first “Happening” in 1960 (shortly after her death), in which attendees/guests were asked to participate in a faux funeral for a sculpture of a murdered corpse. 

Or, people (and very few now) remember this incident because her ghost still seems to linger on in the area of her murder, and isn’t that part of the reason “ghost stories” persist as well. These are spoken tales that force society to confront tragic and shameful events that civic boosters would prefer we just forget. Does this female phantom just want people to remember her? Some cultures believe that the soul dies a second time when there is no one left to tell their story.

So come out, join us, share ghost stories, toast this ghost, and remember … If you dare!

(to read about the last haunted location… )
(to see a map of previous SPIRITS with SPIRITS locations… )

Leave a Comment more...

Haunted Red Line Tour (Summer Edition)

by on Aug.02, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Hunters of Urban Los Angeles | Go to Original Post

Yes, that’s ghost stories combined with riding public transit. What could be scarier? Is there a better way to explore the haunted history of Los Angeles than by traveling underground from location to location via our very own (dead) Red Line Metro Subway?

We will meet-up at Union Station (the starting point for the Red Line) and then travel through 13 stops to the North Hollywood Station (at the end of the line), getting off and on along the way. In addition to Union Station and the North Hollywood Station, we will stop at few other stations, step off the train, rise to street-level, and discuss the ghosts and haunted sites visible from that spot before going back aboard to the next stop on our tour.

Come out and hear spooky tales about a spirit solider, a vanishing padre, and a ghostly car. As well as many other phantom figures from our past that haunt our present.
(see a review of this tour here…)

When: August 5th, 12th, 19th, 26th
(Every Sunday in August.)

Time: Tour starts at 6 pm (tour is about 3 hours)

Meeting Place: The palm tree-lined island in front of Union Station’s main entrance.
800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012 (map)

Price: FREE (donation-based) tour

Note: you will need a Metro Pass ($7 for “Day Pass” + $1 for a “Tap Card”)
Please purchase the Metro Pass (not a “Metrolink” ticket) before the meet-up to save time. The machines can be confusing, so look for metro day fare and not “add fare.”

Your Guide: CONNOR BRIGHT

This paranormal historian has traveled the globe, working alongside experts in the field as well as film and television crews. She calls Los Angeles her home and the spirits of the city her friends. With her former partner she founded “What’s Your Ghost Story?” an online community for people to share paranormal experiences and seek answers from experts. Connor has also worked with Los Angeles Hauntings Ghost Tours, guiding people through LA’s haunted histories. It was through LA Hauntings that Connor met Richard Carradine of GHOULA when they collaborated on the Haunted Houdini Tour of Los Angeles. Connor looks forward to being your host on this year’s GHOULA Red Line Metro Tour!



Parking: Since everyone participating in the tour will need a Metro Day Pass to ride the subway, it is advisable to park at one of the pay lots ($3.00) provided by the Metro at either the North Hollywood Station (our end point) or the Universal City Station (or any of the other lots on connecting Metro lines), and then just take the Subway to Union Station to meet-up with the group The lots around Union Station are expensive and they may close early. Free street parking is available around the North Hollywood station, but please read posted signs concerning parking regulations.

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Haunted Red Line Tour (Summer Edition)

by on Aug.02, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Hunters of Urban Los Angeles | Go to Original Post

Yes, that’s ghost stories combined with riding public transit. What could be scarier? Is there a better way to explore the haunted history of Los Angeles than by traveling underground from location to location via our very own (dead) Red Line Metro Subway?

We will meet-up at Union Station (the starting point for the Red Line) and then travel through 13 stops to the North Hollywood Station (at the end of the line), getting off and on along the way. In addition to Union Station and the North Hollywood Station, we will stop at few other stations, step off the train, rise to street-level, and discuss the ghosts and haunted sites visible from that spot before going back aboard to the next stop on our tour.

Come out and hear spooky tales about a spirit solider, a vanishing padre, and a ghostly car. As well as many other phantom figures from our past that haunt our present.
(see a review of this tour here…)

When: August 5th, 12th, 19th, 26th
(Every Sunday in August.)

Time: Tour starts at 6 pm (tour is about 3 hours)

Meeting Place: The palm tree-lined island in front of Union Station’s main entrance.
800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012 (map)

Price: FREE (donation-based) tour

Note: you will need a Metro Pass ($7 for “Day Pass” + $1 for a “Tap Card”)
Please purchase the Metro Pass (not a “Metrolink” ticket) before the meet-up to save time. The machines can be confusing, so look for metro day fare and not “add fare.”

Your Guide: CONNOR BRIGHT

This paranormal historian has traveled the globe, working alongside experts in the field as well as film and television crews. She calls Los Angeles her home and the spirits of the city her friends. With her former partner she founded “What’s Your Ghost Story?” an online community for people to share paranormal experiences and seek answers from experts. Connor has also worked with Los Angeles Hauntings Ghost Tours, guiding people through LA’s haunted histories. It was through LA Hauntings that Connor met Richard Carradine of GHOULA when they collaborated on the Haunted Houdini Tour of Los Angeles. Connor looks forward to being your host on this year’s GHOULA Red Line Metro Tour!



Parking: Since everyone participating in the tour will need a Metro Day Pass to ride the subway, it is advisable to park at one of the pay lots ($3.00) provided by the Metro at either the North Hollywood Station (our end point) or the Universal City Station (or any of the other lots on connecting Metro lines), and then just take the Subway to Union Station to meet-up with the group The lots around Union Station are expensive and they may close early. Free street parking is available around the North Hollywood station, but please read posted signs concerning parking regulations.

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Visiting Pazuzu: A look a the demon from the Exorcist

by on Jul.26, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

One of the most impressive attractions at The University of Chicago is the Oriental Institute.  This museum features a sizeable exhibition on Assyrian and Babylonian art and history.  As I walked through this lovely museum, I was surprised to see the small statue seen in the photo above.  As a fan of the movie The Exorcist, I recognized this figure immediately.   It was Pazuzu and the plaque beneath read “Pazuzu; 1st Century BC Protective Deity”.   This seemed very contrary to what I had seen of Pazuzu in the Exorcist so I decided to spend some time exploring who Pazuzu was in mythology and history.
In the movie, The Exorcist, based on the book of same name by William Blatty, Pazuzu is the primary antagonist.  At the beginning of the movie, the primary priest and exorcist is seen standing face to face with a giant statue of Pazuzu. This foreshadows the battle that is to come.  Pazuzu is the demon that the two exorcists fight.  He is the demon that possesses a little girl and the final battle is a show down for the girl’s soul.
Of course, the use of Pazuzu specifically is a bit anachronistic.  The English word demon is a translation from the Greek daemon and in Greek this meant spirit.  It didn’t have the negative or Satanic connotation most modern Western, Christian based cultures give the word.  Pazuzu was a demon in the ancient sense of the word rather than the modern sense.  He was a spirit and a god from the 1st century BC and was popular in Assyrian and Babylonian culture.  He appeared in The Epic of Gilgamesh.  He is the god of the underworld and brother to Humbaba.  He controlled the west wind, storms, and locusts.  He was a destructive force but ancient Assyrians would often offer prayers to him as he could also offer protection.  He was terrifying but most gods were in this time.  He was often a protector as well and he was commonly invoked to protect against Lamashtu, a goddess who stole children.  Although he could be helpful, Pazuzu was feared so the statue I saw at the museum was more typical of how he would be represented.  He was so feared that a statue the size of the one seen The Exorcist would have been improbably as the people believed that a statue that large might invoke him and bring his wrath as well.
Although, Pazuzu is terrifying and his image is disturbing.  His use in the exorcist was not true to his mythological representation in Assyrian culture.   Perhaps they should have used a Christian demon instead.  They are more true to the Catholic based spirit of the movie.  After all, the imaged in the movie were more based on our Western fears.

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The Unlucky History of Friday the 13th

by on Jul.13, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

Happy Friday the 13th.  I am reposting my origins of Friday the 13th post to help celebrate this wonderful day.  I hope your 13th is as luck as mine has been!  Friday the 13th is considered the most unlucky day of the year. Most people aren’t entirely sure where this bad luck comes from, but fear of Friday the 13th can affect as many as 1 in 4 people. The fear of Friday the 13th is known as triskaidekaphobia.

“It’s been estimated that [U.S] $800 or $900 million is lost in business on this day because people will not fly or do business they would normally do,” said Donald Dossey, founder of the Stress Management Center and Phobia Institute in Asheville, North Carolina.

So where does this fear that can cripple a nation come from? There really seems to be no consensus on the origin of Friday the 13th. Everyone has a story, but most of them are different. The fear comes from an unknown source. Here’s a look at a few of the Friday the 13th origin stories I’ve found.

One folklorist traces the origins back to Norse mythology. There were 12 gods who had a dinner party in Valhalla. A 13th guest, Loki, was uninvited. Always the trickster, Loki tricked the god of darkness, Hoder, into shooting Balder, the god of joy. Balder died and darkness descended on the earth. Joy was lost to man and from then on 13 was considered unlucky.

In 1307, on October 13, 1307, King Phillip IV of France ordered every member of the order of the Knights Templar executed on charges of high treason and heresy. King Phillip owed the Templar’s a good deal of money and they had amassed an enormous amount of wealth on their crusades. It is thought that the order was actually to strip the Templar’s of their wealth. The Templar’s were tortured horribly and forced to confess to crimes they didn’t commit. They all died, but as the grandmaster died he cursed King Phillip and the day making Friday the 13th unlucky for future generations to come.

Many believe the fear comes from the number 13 itself. According to numerologist, the number 12 is associated with completeness. There are 12 months in a year, 12 zodiac signs, 12 apostles, 12 Olympian gods, 12 tribes of Israel, 12 hours in the clock, 12 labors of Hercules. The list goes on and on. The addition of the 13 ruins perfection is utterly bad and unlucky. In many stories, the 13th guest is always a bad sign. Think Judas at the last supper and Loki in the above story. It is the number 13 that lends the curse to Friday the 13th. Combine that with the unlucky Friday, when Jesus was crucifies and Adam tempted Eve and you have a recipe for an unlucky day.

It is clear there are many reasons to fear the dreaded Friday the 13th, but for me Friday the 13ths have always been lucky. So have a happy Friday the 13th, watch one of the 12 million Friday the 13th movies (I like the one in space), and wish me luck on my lucky day.

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The Unlucky History of Friday the 13th

by on Jul.13, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

Happy Friday the 13th.  I am reposting my origins of Friday the 13th post to help celebrate this wonderful day.  I hope your 13th is as luck as mine has been!  Friday the 13th is considered the most unlucky day of the year. Most people aren’t entirely sure where this bad luck comes from, but fear of Friday the 13th can affect as many as 1 in 4 people. The fear of Friday the 13th is known as triskaidekaphobia.

“It’s been estimated that [U.S] $800 or $900 million is lost in business on this day because people will not fly or do business they would normally do,” said Donald Dossey, founder of the Stress Management Center and Phobia Institute in Asheville, North Carolina.

So where does this fear that can cripple a nation come from? There really seems to be no consensus on the origin of Friday the 13th. Everyone has a story, but most of them are different. The fear comes from an unknown source. Here’s a look at a few of the Friday the 13th origin stories I’ve found.

One folklorist traces the origins back to Norse mythology. There were 12 gods who had a dinner party in Valhalla. A 13th guest, Loki, was uninvited. Always the trickster, Loki tricked the god of darkness, Hoder, into shooting Balder, the god of joy. Balder died and darkness descended on the earth. Joy was lost to man and from then on 13 was considered unlucky.

In 1307, on October 13, 1307, King Phillip IV of France ordered every member of the order of the Knights Templar executed on charges of high treason and heresy. King Phillip owed the Templar’s a good deal of money and they had amassed an enormous amount of wealth on their crusades. It is thought that the order was actually to strip the Templar’s of their wealth. The Templar’s were tortured horribly and forced to confess to crimes they didn’t commit. They all died, but as the grandmaster died he cursed King Phillip and the day making Friday the 13th unlucky for future generations to come.

Many believe the fear comes from the number 13 itself. According to numerologist, the number 12 is associated with completeness. There are 12 months in a year, 12 zodiac signs, 12 apostles, 12 Olympian gods, 12 tribes of Israel, 12 hours in the clock, 12 labors of Hercules. The list goes on and on. The addition of the 13 ruins perfection is utterly bad and unlucky. In many stories, the 13th guest is always a bad sign. Think Judas at the last supper and Loki in the above story. It is the number 13 that lends the curse to Friday the 13th. Combine that with the unlucky Friday, when Jesus was crucifies and Adam tempted Eve and you have a recipe for an unlucky day.

It is clear there are many reasons to fear the dreaded Friday the 13th, but for me Friday the 13ths have always been lucky. So have a happy Friday the 13th, watch one of the 12 million Friday the 13th movies (I like the one in space), and wish me luck on my lucky day.

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A Photographic Journey Through Chicago’s Graceland Cemetery

by on Jul.10, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

Chicago’s history is littered with ghosts and haunted places. It is home to the nation’s first serial killer, H.H. Holmes, and to some of the nation’s most famous gangsters (Al Capone).  Every street offers a new view of some fascinating and dark piece of old and forgotten history.  Ghost tours abound and some are much better than others.  However, my favorite place in Chicago is Graceland Cemetery.  It is the home of several famous ghost stories and it is also the resting place of many of Chicago’s most prominent figures.  What I love most about this necropolis is the beauty of the tombstones.  They are some of the most striking in the world.   The most famous is that of hotelier Dexter Graves. Beside his grave is a  statue called ‘Eternal Silence.’ It was created by Taft in 1909 and is stunningly beautiful. This sculpture was at one point entirely black but time has faded its edges and that has only made it more lovely and more haunting.  Legend has it that if you look into the statues face, you’ll see your own death. I stared for a very long time yesterday, but didn’t see my death.  Maybe I will have to try again tomorrow.


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GHOSTS of OVERA STREET!

by on Jul.03, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Hunters of Urban Los Angeles | Go to Original Post

 
A FREE WALKING TOUR of our historic pueblo!

Take this FREE tour of one of LA’s most haunted environments… if you dare!

The colorful shops and restaurants on Olvera Street are still homes to their first residents. Encounter the spirits and legends of the oldest “street” in Los Angeles. The tiny little pueblo still contains over 20 buildings and 100s of spirits. Find out where the lizard people hid their treasure and secrets. Discover the true story of Pio Pico’s hotel and its tragic history. Hear weeping widows. Learn the stories of haunted food, glowing crosses, and many more.

When: July 8th, 2018 (Sunday)

Time: (Tour #1) 5:00pm – 6:00pm (Tour #2) 6:30pm – 7:30pm

Meeting Place: The Pico House
424 N Main St, Los Angeles, CA 90012 (map)

Price: FREE (donation-based) tour

Note: Even though, walk-ups are welcome. Please RSVP (here).

Your Guide: CONNOR BRIGHT

Connor is a paranormal historian known as the “Paranormal Pixie”. She has traveled the globe, working alongside experts in the field as well as film and television crews. today she calls Los Angeles her home and the spirits of the city her friends. With her former partner she founded “What’s Your Ghost Story?” an online community for people to share paranormal experiences and seek answers from experts. Connor has also worked with Los Angeles Hauntings Ghost Tours, guiding people through LA’s haunted histories. Connor currently has been working alongside Richard Carradine of Ghost Hunters of Urban Los Angeles they have collaborated on the Haunted Houdini Tour of Los Angeles, she recently hosted GHOULA’s iconic Red Line Tour.

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GHOSTS of OVERA STREET!

by on Jul.03, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Hunters of Urban Los Angeles | Go to Original Post

 
A FREE WALKING TOUR of our historic pueblo!

Take this FREE tour of one of LA’s most haunted environments… if you dare!

The colorful shops and restaurants on Olvera Street are still homes to their first residents. Encounter the spirits and legends of the oldest “street” in Los Angeles. The tiny little pueblo still contains over 20 buildings and 100s of spirits. Find out where the lizard people hid their treasure and secrets. Discover the true story of Pio Pico’s hotel and its tragic history. Hear weeping widows. Learn the stories of haunted food, glowing crosses, and many more.

When: July 8th, 2018 (Sunday)

Time: (Tour #1) 5:00pm – 6:00pm (Tour #2) 6:30pm – 7:30pm

Meeting Place: The Pico House
424 N Main St, Los Angeles, CA 90012 (map)

Price: FREE (donation-based) tour

Note: Even though, walk-ups are welcome. Please RSVP (here).

Your Guide: CONNOR BRIGHT

Connor is a paranormal historian known as the “Paranormal Pixie”. She has traveled the globe, working alongside experts in the field as well as film and television crews. today she calls Los Angeles her home and the spirits of the city her friends. With her former partner she founded “What’s Your Ghost Story?” an online community for people to share paranormal experiences and seek answers from experts. Connor has also worked with Los Angeles Hauntings Ghost Tours, guiding people through LA’s haunted histories. Connor currently has been working alongside Richard Carradine of Ghost Hunters of Urban Los Angeles they have collaborated on the Haunted Houdini Tour of Los Angeles, she recently hosted GHOULA’s iconic Red Line Tour.

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