How to Get Rid of a Haunting

by on Mar.17, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

 My parents don’t talk much about ghosts.  They will talk about their paranormal experiences if you ask them, but they like to keep their experiences hidden in the shadows.  My father didn’t believe in ghosts when he met my mother.   He thought of himself as a man of logic.   He still does.  He is an engineer and he believes in what he can touch and see, but even he can’t explain many of the things that have happened at their current home.  In fact, it got so bad that at some point they brought the priest in for a cleansing ritual.  The priest blessed all the rooms in the house and put stickers on the door frames to act as barriers to prevent bad spirits from entering the rooms.  My old room was one of the most haunted rooms and the sticker from the priest’s blessing still remains in the door frame today.   Having a priest come and bless your home or a pastor is one of the oldest Christian cleansing rituals and is common in Western culture.  The image of a priest exorcising the demons a house has also come to be one of the most iconic images in paranormal popular culture.  Most parish priests will bless the homes of their parishioners and my parents only had to submit a small request for this to be done.   My parents report that it helped reduced the activity in their home, although it did not stop it altogether.

Another fairly popular mechanism for cleansing bad spirits and negative energy from your home

comes from Native American tradition and consists of a ritual smudging.  The use of dried white sage is a 2000 year old tradition.   Shamans used dried sage in their fires to call on ancestral spirits to take negative energy from a home or a person.   Smudging kits today are fairly popular and can be bought at any new age store or on amazon.com.  I can’t testify to how helpful these rituals are in the face of an actual haunting, but I have heard others say that they can be helpful. 

Salt is also a common ingredient in cleansing rituals.  The use of salt to ward off evil spirits has been popular in many cultures and dates back to the old testament.   Salt is said to protect any home or person from any bad spirit or entity.   It should be sprinkled liberally on door frames and windows and throughout the house to drive away negative spirits. 

My sister uses techniques she learned in Reiki and doing energy work to cleanse cursed objects and objects with negative spiritual energy attached to them.  As a licensed therapist, I have had several clients come to me who believe they are being tormented by ghosts and poltergeists.  After screening for more serious mental illness and ruling it out, I have helped them drive their negative spirits away using a principle that unites almost all of these techniques.   All spirits require energy to grow strong and if you take that energy from them, they will fade and dissipate.  Replace the negativity in you and your life with positive energy and let go of your fear.   Spirits feed on fear.   The most effective cleansing exercise I have ever done is to simply stand with someone in strength without fear and have them tell the spirit to go away.  All cleansing exercises share one thing, they take the fear away, thus diminishing the manifestation.   When faced with any spirit, the first step is to find your strength and diminish your fear.  A guide who is experienced in this can help.  If you can not find one,  you can always email me for help. 

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GHOULA’s Annual Report

by on Feb.28, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Hunters of Urban Los Angeles | Go to Original Post


(Alhambran F.E. Ormsby, creator of the 13 month calendar, 1929)

We’re Back! As many of you have realized, GHOULA has been pretty quiet the last couple of years with the notable exception of having a presence at GHOULA’s favorite Halloween Convention MIDSUMMER”S SCREAM. In 2016, we even curated an exhibition of haunted/cursed objects (Click here to see pictures of the exhibit).

Founder/organizer/guide/host Richard Carradine needed a little break from all these spooky events we were doing. Well, the break time is over, and its time to get back to work. GHOULA will be up and running again in 2018 with more new events (and some old favorite events). This is largely due to the help from another local ghost expert, Connor Bright (aka “The Paranormal Pixie”). Many of you met Connor on our resurrected Haunted Red Line Subway Tour last October. Richard will be taking a more behind the scenes role organizing the upcoming events, while Connor will take on the hosting/guiding duties.

The question that we are asked most often at GHOULA HQ is “When is SPIRITS with SPIRIT coming back?” So, let’s address this first… We took a break from our monthly meet-ups in historic (haunted) bars to concentrate on other events we wanted to do, namely off-beat ghost events that celebrate the twisted history our city. That temporary hiatus continued when all events went on hiatus, and GHOULA took a break. This year we will bring back SPIRITS with SPIRITS in the six months leading up to October on the 13th of those months (starting May 13th).

As for the other planned events for 2018, you are going to have to wait and see. So, keep checking or blog (www.ghoula.org) and our facebook page, this is where we will announce these upcoming events. You can also sign up on our mailing list, and we’ll send you an email with the info. Hope to see you soon.

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WELCOME!

by on Feb.17, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Hunters of Urban Los Angeles | Go to Original Post

In the event you have stumbled across this page, and know nothing about GHOULA. We are a social club dedicated to the preservation of greater L.A.’s rich haunted history, and the promotion and celebration of this local lore through ghostly gatherings, events, and publications. We are open to all, from the curious skeptic to the passionate phantom pursuer. In the past, we have done walking tours, bus tours, and even subway tours exploring our city’s strangest ghost stories. We have produced theatrical revues in historic haunted locations (creepy puppet shows, free outdoor screenings, dances that conjure the spirits, etc). We have even published books about this stuff (see sidebar to the right). We have curated perfumes that bring to life LA’s stinkiest phantoms, created exhibits of local haunted artifacts, but what people generally know us from are our meet-ups in haunted bars (“Spirits with Spirits”). Basically, we like to tell ghost stories about Los Angeles’ darker history, while exploring our city. If you are in to that kind of stuff (and if you are still reading this, we’re going to guess that you are), then we are the club for you! Please subscribe for our mailing list (upper left corner) and we will notify you about our next ghostly gathering. Thanks!

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The Moody Brick and the Tragic Story of Joseph Sanders

by on Feb.07, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

One of my favorite chapters in my book Haunted North Alabama is the chapter about The Moody Brick.  In fact,  The Moody Brick is one of my favorite ghost stories.   When I did a presentation on ghost stories at the library,  a lovely lady named Ms. Dorothea came to see the presentation just to discuss the Moody Brick with me.   She had read my book and wanted to share her family history with me.   Although she was no ghost story junky, she collected stories about the Moody Brick because her family was linked to the old house.   This week, she sent me an amazing collection of photographs and information about and of The Moody Brick.  I am honored to share this information.

For those of you who haven’t read Haunted North Alabama, The Moody Brick is an old plantation house in rural Alabama.  Its bricks positively drip with ghost stories and old legends.  The ghost stories there are so thick you’d have to shovel them away to see past them.   The stories start with tortured slaves who rise up to kill their masters and enter into the civil war when the house was used as a hospital and keep on going through suicide and tragedies.   Ms. Dorothea added another sorrowful tale to the Moody Brick’s history.

The paperwork she sent me told of her 3rd Grandfather, Joseph Sanders.   She sent me information that came from a grave website and was submitted by Gary Sanders.  When describing the family relations to the Moody Brick  he told this story:
     “Joseph Sanders had some rebel neighbors.   The rebel neighbors hung him on a mulberry tree because they thought he was giving information to the Yankees.  There were three of the rebels, one a neighbor by the name of Barbee-after killing him they left with a horse thy were using as a pack mule to carry the things that they had taken.  That evening, not long after the rebels had left, a group of Yankees came down out of the mountain and went after the rebels.   They caught up with them near the foot of the mountain close to the old Moody Brick.  The Yankees killed te horse and made the men dig a grave for it.  When the grave was dug- they killed the men- put them in the hole and rolled the horse on top of them. “

 There seem to be many variations on this story.  In some variations, Sanders is shot and killed by bushwhackers rather than rebels.  Either way, the murderers were killed and buried under the mulberry tree at The Moody Brick, adding to the many ghosts that wander the grounds.

Ms. Dorothea also sent me information on The Harris/Moody Brick Family Cemetery located on the grounds of The Moody Brick.  According to this information there are seven marked graves on the cite and six graves with markers but no inscriptions.  There may be as many as 50 graves on the property outside the fenced in family cemetery area.  There was a clean up of the area in 2005 and they attempted to mark as many of these graves as possible with concrete blocks. 

Other information she sent me included a tour guide for the Moody Brick and farm with its history on it.  The tour guide describes the restoration of this beautiful old home and its significance in the history of the region.  It also described the architectural evolution of the house.  At the bottom of the brochure it states: “We appreciate your interest in this historic home.  Unfortunately for some, it is not a paranormal site- no ghosts here.”  It is clear the current owners want to respect the history of their amazing house and dispel the folklore and fascination associated with it.  I respect that and include this information in this post so people know not to travel to the house expecting to ghost hunt there.  Although I love the many ghost stories surrounding the house, I appreciate that the current owners want no part in them and ask people to come and visit to enjoy the rich and interesting history, not the ghosts.

   The pictures Ms. Dorothea sent me are included in this post. I can not thank Ms. Dorothea enough for all the information she sent me and for coming to talk with me about hr family history and the history of the Moody Brick.  I wish I could write another book and include the wealth of information she has sent me.  It was an honor to meet someone who is a part of the history I love and for them to holds me in enough regard to send me information on their family.     

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The Moody Brick and the Tragic Story of Joseph Sanders

by on Feb.07, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

One of my favorite chapters in my book Haunted North Alabama is the chapter about The Moody Brick.  In fact,  The Moody Brick is one of my favorite ghost stories.   When I did a presentation on ghost stories at the library,  a lovely lady named Ms. Dorothea came to see the presentation just to discuss the Moody Brick with me.   She had read my book and wanted to share her family history with me.   Although she was no ghost story junky, she collected stories about the Moody Brick because her family was linked to the old house.   This week, she sent me an amazing collection of photographs and information about and of The Moody Brick.  I am honored to share this information.

For those of you who haven’t read Haunted North Alabama, The Moody Brick is an old plantation house in rural Alabama.  Its bricks positively drip with ghost stories and old legends.  The ghost stories there are so thick you’d have to shovel them away to see past them.   The stories start with tortured slaves who rise up to kill their masters and enter into the civil war when the house was used as a hospital and keep on going through suicide and tragedies.   Ms. Dorothea added another sorrowful tale to the Moody Brick’s history.

The paperwork she sent me told of her 3rd Grandfather, Joseph Sanders.   She sent me information that came from a grave website and was submitted by Gary Sanders.  When describing the family relations to the Moody Brick  he told this story:
     “Joseph Sanders had some rebel neighbors.   The rebel neighbors hung him on a mulberry tree because they thought he was giving information to the Yankees.  There were three of the rebels, one a neighbor by the name of Barbee-after killing him they left with a horse thy were using as a pack mule to carry the things that they had taken.  That evening, not long after the rebels had left, a group of Yankees came down out of the mountain and went after the rebels.   They caught up with them near the foot of the mountain close to the old Moody Brick.  The Yankees killed te horse and made the men dig a grave for it.  When the grave was dug- they killed the men- put them in the hole and rolled the horse on top of them. “

 There seem to be many variations on this story.  In some variations, Sanders is shot and killed by bushwhackers rather than rebels.  Either way, the murderers were killed and buried under the mulberry tree at The Moody Brick, adding to the many ghosts that wander the grounds.

Ms. Dorothea also sent me information on The Harris/Moody Brick Family Cemetery located on the grounds of The Moody Brick.  According to this information there are seven marked graves on the cite and six graves with markers but no inscriptions.  There may be as many as 50 graves on the property outside the fenced in family cemetery area.  There was a clean up of the area in 2005 and they attempted to mark as many of these graves as possible with concrete blocks. 

Other information she sent me included a tour guide for the Moody Brick and farm with its history on it.  The tour guide describes the restoration of this beautiful old home and its significance in the history of the region.  It also described the architectural evolution of the house.  At the bottom of the brochure it states: “We appreciate your interest in this historic home.  Unfortunately for some, it is not a paranormal site- no ghosts here.”  It is clear the current owners want to respect the history of their amazing house and dispel the folklore and fascination associated with it.  I respect that and include this information in this post so people know not to travel to the house expecting to ghost hunt there.  Although I love the many ghost stories surrounding the house, I appreciate that the current owners want no part in them and ask people to come and visit to enjoy the rich and interesting history, not the ghosts.

   The pictures Ms. Dorothea sent me are included in this post. I can not thank Ms. Dorothea enough for all the information she sent me and for coming to talk with me about hr family history and the history of the Moody Brick.  I wish I could write another book and include the wealth of information she has sent me.  It was an honor to meet someone who is a part of the history I love and for them to holds me in enough regard to send me information on their family.     

Leave a Comment more...

The Moody Brick and the Tragic Story of Joseph Sanders

by on Feb.07, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

One of my favorite chapters in my book Haunted North Alabama is the chapter about The Moody Brick.  In fact,  The Moody Brick is one of my favorite ghost stories.   When I did a presentation on ghost stories at the library,  a lovely lady named Ms. Dorothea came to see the presentation just to discuss the Moody Brick with me.   She had read my book and wanted to share her family history with me.   Although she was no ghost story junky, she collected stories about the Moody Brick because her family was linked to the old house.   This week, she sent me an amazing collection of photographs and information about and of The Moody Brick.  I am honored to share this information.

For those of you who haven’t read Haunted North Alabama, The Moody Brick is an old plantation house in rural Alabama.  Its bricks positively drip with ghost stories and old legends.  The ghost stories there are so thick you’d have to shovel them away to see past them.   The stories start with tortured slaves who rise up to kill their masters and enter into the civil war when the house was used as a hospital and keep on going through suicide and tragedies.   Ms. Dorothea added another sorrowful tale to the Moody Brick’s history.

The paperwork she sent me told of her 3rd Grandfather, Joseph Sanders.   She sent me information that came from a grave website and was submitted by Gary Sanders.  When describing the family relations to the Moody Brick  he told this story:
     “Joseph Sanders had some rebel neighbors.   The rebel neighbors hung him on a mulberry tree because they thought he was giving information to the Yankees.  There were three of the rebels, one a neighbor by the name of Barbee-after killing him they left with a horse thy were using as a pack mule to carry the things that they had taken.  That evening, not long after the rebels had left, a group of Yankees came down out of the mountain and went after the rebels.   They caught up with them near the foot of the mountain close to the old Moody Brick.  The Yankees killed te horse and made the men dig a grave for it.  When the grave was dug- they killed the men- put them in the hole and rolled the horse on top of them. “

 There seem to be many variations on this story.  In some variations, Sanders is shot and killed by bushwhackers rather than rebels.  Either way, the murderers were killed and buried under the mulberry tree at The Moody Brick, adding to the many ghosts that wander the grounds.

Ms. Dorothea also sent me information on The Harris/Moody Brick Family Cemetery located on the grounds of The Moody Brick.  According to this information there are seven marked graves on the cite and six graves with markers but no inscriptions.  There may be as many as 50 graves on the property outside the fenced in family cemetery area.  There was a clean up of the area in 2005 and they attempted to mark as many of these graves as possible with concrete blocks. 

Other information she sent me included a tour guide for the Moody Brick and farm with its history on it.  The tour guide describes the restoration of this beautiful old home and its significance in the history of the region.  It also described the architectural evolution of the house.  At the bottom of the brochure it states: “We appreciate your interest in this historic home.  Unfortunately for some, it is not a paranormal site- no ghosts here.”  It is clear the current owners want to respect the history of their amazing house and dispel the folklore and fascination associated with it.  I respect that and include this information in this post so people know not to travel to the house expecting to ghost hunt there.  Although I love the many ghost stories surrounding the house, I appreciate that the current owners want no part in them and ask people to come and visit to enjoy the rich and interesting history, not the ghosts.

   The pictures Ms. Dorothea sent me are included in this post. I can not thank Ms. Dorothea enough for all the information she sent me and for coming to talk with me about hr family history and the history of the Moody Brick.  I wish I could write another book and include the wealth of information she has sent me.  It was an honor to meet someone who is a part of the history I love and for them to holds me in enough regard to send me information on their family.     

Leave a Comment more...

The Moody Brick and the Tragic Story of Joseph Sanders

by on Feb.07, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

One of my favorite chapters in my book Haunted North Alabama is the chapter about The Moody Brick.  In fact,  The Moody Brick is one of my favorite ghost stories.   When I did a presentation on ghost stories at the library,  a lovely lady named Ms. Dorothea came to see the presentation just to discuss the Moody Brick with me.   She had read my book and wanted to share her family history with me.   Although she was no ghost story junky, she collected stories about the Moody Brick because her family was linked to the old house.   This week, she sent me an amazing collection of photographs and information about and of The Moody Brick.  I am honored to share this information.

For those of you who haven’t read Haunted North Alabama, The Moody Brick is an old plantation house in rural Alabama.  Its bricks positively drip with ghost stories and old legends.  The ghost stories there are so thick you’d have to shovel them away to see past them.   The stories start with tortured slaves who rise up to kill their masters and enter into the civil war when the house was used as a hospital and keep on going through suicide and tragedies.   Ms. Dorothea added another sorrowful tale to the Moody Brick’s history.

The paperwork she sent me told of her 3rd Grandfather, Joseph Sanders.   She sent me information that came from a grave website and was submitted by Gary Sanders.  When describing the family relations to the Moody Brick  he told this story:
     “Joseph Sanders had some rebel neighbors.   The rebel neighbors hung him on a mulberry tree because they thought he was giving information to the Yankees.  There were three of the rebels, one a neighbor by the name of Barbee-after killing him they left with a horse thy were using as a pack mule to carry the things that they had taken.  That evening, not long after the rebels had left, a group of Yankees came down out of the mountain and went after the rebels.   They caught up with them near the foot of the mountain close to the old Moody Brick.  The Yankees killed te horse and made the men dig a grave for it.  When the grave was dug- they killed the men- put them in the hole and rolled the horse on top of them. “

 There seem to be many variations on this story.  In some variations, Sanders is shot and killed by bushwhackers rather than rebels.  Either way, the murderers were killed and buried under the mulberry tree at The Moody Brick, adding to the many ghosts that wander the grounds.

Ms. Dorothea also sent me information on The Harris/Moody Brick Family Cemetery located on the grounds of The Moody Brick.  According to this information there are seven marked graves on the cite and six graves with markers but no inscriptions.  There may be as many as 50 graves on the property outside the fenced in family cemetery area.  There was a clean up of the area in 2005 and they attempted to mark as many of these graves as possible with concrete blocks. 

Other information she sent me included a tour guide for the Moody Brick and farm with its history on it.  The tour guide describes the restoration of this beautiful old home and its significance in the history of the region.  It also described the architectural evolution of the house.  At the bottom of the brochure it states: “We appreciate your interest in this historic home.  Unfortunately for some, it is not a paranormal site- no ghosts here.”  It is clear the current owners want to respect the history of their amazing house and dispel the folklore and fascination associated with it.  I respect that and include this information in this post so people know not to travel to the house expecting to ghost hunt there.  Although I love the many ghost stories surrounding the house, I appreciate that the current owners want no part in them and ask people to come and visit to enjoy the rich and interesting history, not the ghosts.

   The pictures Ms. Dorothea sent me are included in this post. I can not thank Ms. Dorothea enough for all the information she sent me and for coming to talk with me about hr family history and the history of the Moody Brick.  I wish I could write another book and include the wealth of information she has sent me.  It was an honor to meet someone who is a part of the history I love and for them to holds me in enough regard to send me information on their family.     

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Can Divining Rods be Used to Communicate with the Spirit World?

by on Jan.16, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

In November, I went on the Mobile Ghost Tour.  This tour of downtown Mobile took us through many of Mobile’s most haunted locations.   It also gave us a brief introduction to ghost hunting with divining rods

Historically, divining rods were a forked or y shaped branch that would be used by “water” or “willow” witches to do something called dousing.  Dousing is a type of divination that was used to find water or wells.  Dousing was also used to find all sorts of buried gems, minerals and treasures.  Divining rods have been used in this context for thousands of years and they are nothing new.  Many mystics and spiritualists have taken this method of divination quite seriously and multiple books and theories have been published on this topic.    A french priest and douser, Alex Bouly, renamed dousing  radieshtesia in 1927 and thus added an air of respectability to the practice.

However,  using copper divining rods to communicate with the dead is a relatively new practice. The practice is easy.  During our ghost hunt, we stood very still in a vacant lot where a homeless man had been murdered.   It was also the site of a famous lynching and an old cemetery.  We also went to the famously haunted Richard’s house and the old Masonic Temple. There were many ghosts for us to talk too.  We held the rods up and asked questions to the spirits.  We held one rod in each hand directly in front of us.  Theoretically,  the rods were supposed to respond to our questions.  Their movement should be driven by spiritual activity.   We held a rod in each hand and if they crossed that was a no and if they seperated that was a yes.  They could also point in response to our questions. 

I did a lot of experimentation with these rods and what I found was that unless you can keep your hands as still as granite, much of the movement and fluctionat in the rods was due more to very minor shifts and movements in my arms and hands.   After a few hours, I determined that the divining rods responded too easily to very minor movement to be reliable.  I did manage to convince the tour guide I was a lightning rod for the spirit world by moving my pinky slightly to the right which created a swirling motion in the rod that was quiet impressive.  Even when I was attempting to be perfectly still, any minor tremor resulted in massive movements in the rods. 

Behavioral observation lead me to believe that the rods were responding similarly to my fellow ghost hunters.  I observed minor fluctuations in their hands and slight movements that I don’t even think they were aware of. 

In conclusion,  using the diving rods for ghost hunting was fun.  Everyone on the tour enjoyed it, but I don’t think they were any real link to the unknown.  I think they were more a link to how still we could keep our hands and arms.  These rods are very easy to come by and can be purchased on amazon.com if you would like to experiment with them yourself.  Below are some of the pictures of the locations we ghost hunted at. 

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Can Divining Rods be Used to Communicate with the Spirit World?

by on Jan.16, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

In November, I went on the Mobile Ghost Tour.  This tour of downtown Mobile took us through many of Mobile’s most haunted locations.   It also gave us a brief introduction to ghost hunting with divining rods

Historically, divining rods were a forked or y shaped branch that would be used by “water” or “willow” witches to do something called dousing.  Dousing is a type of divination that was used to find water or wells.  Dousing was also used to find all sorts of buried gems, minerals and treasures.  Divining rods have been used in this context for thousands of years and they are nothing new.  Many mystics and spiritualists have taken this method of divination quite seriously and multiple books and theories have been published on this topic.    A french priest and douser, Alex Bouly, renamed dousing  radieshtesia in 1927 and thus added an air of respectability to the practice.

However,  using copper divining rods to communicate with the dead is a relatively new practice. The practice is easy.  During our ghost hunt, we stood very still in a vacant lot where a homeless man had been murdered.   It was also the site of a famous lynching and an old cemetery.  We also went to the famously haunted Richard’s house and the old Masonic Temple. There were many ghosts for us to talk too.  We held the rods up and asked questions to the spirits.  We held one rod in each hand directly in front of us.  Theoretically,  the rods were supposed to respond to our questions.  Their movement should be driven by spiritual activity.   We held a rod in each hand and if they crossed that was a no and if they seperated that was a yes.  They could also point in response to our questions. 

I did a lot of experimentation with these rods and what I found was that unless you can keep your hands as still as granite, much of the movement and fluctionat in the rods was due more to very minor shifts and movements in my arms and hands.   After a few hours, I determined that the divining rods responded too easily to very minor movement to be reliable.  I did manage to convince the tour guide I was a lightning rod for the spirit world by moving my pinky slightly to the right which created a swirling motion in the rod that was quiet impressive.  Even when I was attempting to be perfectly still, any minor tremor resulted in massive movements in the rods. 

Behavioral observation lead me to believe that the rods were responding similarly to my fellow ghost hunters.  I observed minor fluctuations in their hands and slight movements that I don’t even think they were aware of. 

In conclusion,  using the diving rods for ghost hunting was fun.  Everyone on the tour enjoyed it, but I don’t think they were any real link to the unknown.  I think they were more a link to how still we could keep our hands and arms.  These rods are very easy to come by and can be purchased on amazon.com if you would like to experiment with them yourself.  Below are some of the pictures of the locations we ghost hunted at. 

Leave a Comment more...

Can Divining Rods be Used to Communicate with the Spirit World?

by on Jan.16, 2018, under From the Web

Reposted from Ghost Stories and Haunted Places | Go to Original Post

In November, I went on the Mobile Ghost Tour.  This tour of downtown Mobile took us through many of Mobile’s most haunted locations.   It also gave us a brief introduction to ghost hunting with divining rods

Historically, divining rods were a forked or y shaped branch that would be used by “water” or “willow” witches to do something called dousing.  Dousing is a type of divination that was used to find water or wells.  Dousing was also used to find all sorts of buried gems, minerals and treasures.  Divining rods have been used in this context for thousands of years and they are nothing new.  Many mystics and spiritualists have taken this method of divination quite seriously and multiple books and theories have been published on this topic.    A french priest and douser, Alex Bouly, renamed dousing  radieshtesia in 1927 and thus added an air of respectability to the practice.

However,  using copper divining rods to communicate with the dead is a relatively new practice. The practice is easy.  During our ghost hunt, we stood very still in a vacant lot where a homeless man had been murdered.   It was also the site of a famous lynching and an old cemetery.  We also went to the famously haunted Richard’s house and the old Masonic Temple. There were many ghosts for us to talk too.  We held the rods up and asked questions to the spirits.  We held one rod in each hand directly in front of us.  Theoretically,  the rods were supposed to respond to our questions.  Their movement should be driven by spiritual activity.   We held a rod in each hand and if they crossed that was a no and if they seperated that was a yes.  They could also point in response to our questions. 

I did a lot of experimentation with these rods and what I found was that unless you can keep your hands as still as granite, much of the movement and fluctionat in the rods was due more to very minor shifts and movements in my arms and hands.   After a few hours, I determined that the divining rods responded too easily to very minor movement to be reliable.  I did manage to convince the tour guide I was a lightning rod for the spirit world by moving my pinky slightly to the right which created a swirling motion in the rod that was quiet impressive.  Even when I was attempting to be perfectly still, any minor tremor resulted in massive movements in the rods. 

Behavioral observation lead me to believe that the rods were responding similarly to my fellow ghost hunters.  I observed minor fluctuations in their hands and slight movements that I don’t even think they were aware of. 

In conclusion,  using the diving rods for ghost hunting was fun.  Everyone on the tour enjoyed it, but I don’t think they were any real link to the unknown.  I think they were more a link to how still we could keep our hands and arms.  These rods are very easy to come by and can be purchased on amazon.com if you would like to experiment with them yourself.  Below are some of the pictures of the locations we ghost hunted at. 

Leave a Comment more...

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